Tag Archives: propaganda

Navy Seals


“You’re dealing with extremists.”

“You’re dealing with the Navy Seals.”

Navy Seals is Top Gun but less homoerotic and more cocaine fueled. After all, it stars Charlie Sheen (post Wall Street) as a self-absorbed, sociopathic Navy Seal who is amusingly racist (he calls the Japanese “Japs,” Muslims “rags,” and just about any other racial slur you can imaging). The film focuses heavily on mindless action and vaguely defined character traits – using the terms “good guys” and “bad guys” often and, like any good American propaganda made after the Cold War, its primary antagonists are Middle Eastern (Navy Seals’ main action takes place in Beirut, Lebanon). It’s the type of film which brings to mind Sel from Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Holy Mountain, who makes war toys and begins propaganda campaigns against future enemies years before any actual conflict; it’s also a film undoubtedly fueled by massive amount of cocaine and excess.
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Cars 2


What the hell is going on with Cars? There are no people – yet there are sidewalks. I never saw the first film so maybe I’m missing something but I’ve had a hard time wrapping my brain around the universe portrayed in it. Maybe I’m overanalyzing it, punching a dead horse, and whatever other cliché you can insert here but it’s wrong – on many levels. Finally I’ve concocted a theorem about Cars’ civilization:

A long time ago motor vehicles gained consciousness somehow and overtook humanity. Subdued, in a Matrix-like fashion, humans are now the fuel for the cars (one character mentions “fossil fuels” at some point). Very much like Motel Hell the humans are harvested, possibly living in a computer generated reality, and used as fuel. Why else would there be sidewalks in a civilization entirely populated by cars?
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Battle: Los Angeles

Although I originally saw this movie about two weeks ago I’m writing about it now; partially because I had a great deal of academic responsibilities and partially because I wanted to think about the film before ripping into it. Basically, I didn’t want to needlessly bash this film before contemplating it for a few days but after about two weeks I feel confident in completely ripping it apart. In short, I really didn’t like Battle: Los Angeles. I found it a halfhearted copy of Independence Day, a mixture of Emmerich’s mediocre science fiction extravaganza and American military propaganda. I walked out of the theater saying to myself, “must join the Marines, must join the Marines,” before realizing I’m a pacifist and would rather rot in prison than join the military.
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Hearts and Minds

Peter Davis’ Vietnam War documentary Hearts and Minds is probably one of the most captivating documentaries I’ve ever seen. It’s also highly biased and a prime example of how documentaries are never devoid of subjectivity, regardless of intention. Despite Davis’ blatant anti-war stance, Hearts and Minds is powerful, insightful, and brilliantly edited – all factors that led a 1975 Academy Award. The film was controversial when released in theaters and I believe it still is. Aside from its depictions of violence it also features a barrage of violent sentiments and overt objectification of women. Such scenes seem necessary, demonstrating the effects of an imperialist occupation from a multi faceted perspective. Just exhibiting combat violence doesn’t give a full picture of what happened and Davis shows how the war damaged both the Vietnamese and the United States. Continue reading