Tag Archives: Michael Biehn

Navy Seals


“You’re dealing with extremists.”

“You’re dealing with the Navy Seals.”

Navy Seals is Top Gun but less homoerotic and more cocaine fueled. After all, it stars Charlie Sheen (post Wall Street) as a self-absorbed, sociopathic Navy Seal who is amusingly racist (he calls the Japanese “Japs,” Muslims “rags,” and just about any other racial slur you can imaging). The film focuses heavily on mindless action and vaguely defined character traits – using the terms “good guys” and “bad guys” often and, like any good American propaganda made after the Cold War, its primary antagonists are Middle Eastern (Navy Seals’ main action takes place in Beirut, Lebanon). It’s the type of film which brings to mind Sel from Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Holy Mountain, who makes war toys and begins propaganda campaigns against future enemies years before any actual conflict; it’s also a film undoubtedly fueled by massive amount of cocaine and excess.
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The Terminator and Technology (part 2)


My friend Justin claims Terminator 2: Judgment Day is really the story of a boy teaching a robot how to love. I feel he’s correct but it’s akin to saying the moral of Forest Gump is that he only had sex once. Aside from its obvious intention – making more money – Terminator 2 is a great continuation of the themes explored in the 1984 original. A few days ago I wrote an article about the original Terminator, discussing the technological implications of the film and how certain concepts from it have come to pass (click here to read that article). While nuclear annihilation hasn’t occurred (and its actual arrival is always questionable) humanity’s submission to our technological masters is well under way; Terminator 2 is just another example of how those who create new technologies aren’t the best candidates for determining its implications.
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The Terminator and Technology (part 1)


I just picked up James Cameron’s 1984 film The Terminator on Blu-ray the other day and I’m glad I did. I’ve always been a fan of the Terminator films and the original is still my favorite. I loathe James Cameron as a person (I think he’s a conceded, egotistical prick) but I can’t deny he makes good films. Ok, so maybe Avatar and Titanic aren’t that great (Titanic is enjoyable, even though it’s overly sentimental) but films like Aliens, the Terminator films, Piranha II: The Spawning, and True Lies are excellent – a prime example of why Cameron is lauded by so many. However, moving back to The Terminator, I’ve always felt this film is a great example of what technology can do when left to its own devices. Neil Postman argues in Technopoly that the makers of a technology aren’t the best candidates for determining its application; The Terminator demonstrates how a technology, which resembles cloud computing and is a form of artificial intelligence, can go awry when implemented by those who create it.
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