Tag Archives: Dennis Hopper

An old Texas Chainsaw Massacre II ad

Here’s another lazy post because I’m entering the final stretch with my thesis. I found this earlier and thought it was awesome. I miss the days when these kinds of advertisements appeared in the back of magazines. Now only if I can find the shirt they’re selling. I already have one Texas Chainsaw Massacre II shirt from 25 years ago but I’d love to have another.

True Grit: A Comparison of Two Versions

The Coen Brothers’ latest outing is a contemporary rendition of Chares Portis’ 1968 novel True Grit. Originally brought to the silver screen in ’69 by director Henry Hathaway (Niagara, Call Northside 777) and featuring John Wayne, singer Glen Campbell, and Kim Darby (the mother from Better Off Dead), the over 40 years between the two renditions shows a drastic change in filmmaking. Where Hathaway’s version features an almost lighthearted approach to the Western genre, Joel and Ethan Coen’s interpretation is grim, dark, and explores the darker aspects of humanity. There’s also a vast difference between performances. Although Wayne is a competent Rooster Cogburn, his Oscar winning performance lacks the tough demeanor the character demands – a trait Jeff Bridges brings to the role. The 2010 version of True Grit contains exactly what the title exclaims: grit. It’s a meticulously fashioned film, presenting an honest account of vengeance whereas the John Wayne version embodies the mythological interpretation of the Old West common in western films of the era. Continue reading

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2

“You got one choice boy: sex or the saw!”

I don’t think its fair comparing The Texas Chainsaw Massacre II to the 1974 original – they’re different beast’s altogether. Even though Tobe Hooper directed both, each film has its own feel. The second film is based on the original and even contains many of the same characters, but it approaches similar subject matter quite differently. Hooper’s original is disgusting, but not because of overt visual violence but because the psychological brutality the cannibalistic family inflicts on Sally, the film’s one survivor. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre II isn’t nearly as torturous, instead placing gore effects in Tom Savini’s capable hands and relying on bloodshed and completely bizarre, and darkly comedic, situations. For all its grizzly violence, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre II is a comedy – very dark and sadistic comedy.
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